North Yorkshire Faces Shortage of Fully Trained GPs
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North Yorkshire Faces Shortage of Fully Trained GPs

The Government has pledged to recruit 6,000 more GPs by 2025, but the number of GPs across England has been decreasing since 2015. The British Medical Association trade union has called the GP workforce situation a “crisis” and accused the Government of recruiting cheaper non-GP staff. According to NHS Digital figures, there were 239 full-time-equivalent fully trained GPs working at surgeries in the former NHS North Yorkshire CCG area in November, with a marginal increase in the national number of fully-trained GPs across England. However, compared to figures from 2015, there has been a significant decrease in the number of fully trained GPs.

Dr. Julius Parker, deputy chair of the BMA’s GP Committee for England, stated that the GP workforce crisis is putting patient care and safety at risk and called for the Government to prioritize GP recruitment and retention. While there has been a 1.8% increase in the total number of GPs in England, the number of practice staff excluding GPs has increased by 2.6% in the last year, surpassing GP recruitment.

In response, a spokesperson from the Department of Health and Social Care highlighted the increase in doctors and staff in general practice and the highest-ever number of doctors accepting a place on GP training. They also emphasized the government’s commitment to investing in the primary care workforce through their Primary Care Recovery Plan and Long Term Workforce Plan.