Councillor calls for safety upgrades on Acomb Road in York
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Councillor calls for safety upgrades on Acomb Road in York

Holgate councillor Kallum Taylor spoke out after the most recent crash in Acomb Road, on January 11, which saw a car flip onto its side. Fire crews had to get in through the boot to free the occupant, who was unhurt. Cllr Taylor tweeted in the immediate aftermath of the incident ‘Hope all involved are OK. But he then added, in the same post: “How many more, @CityofYork/ @NYorksPolice?” Speaking to The Press, Cllr Taylor said that the website crashmap.co.uk revealed that, in the last 24 years, there have been no fewer than 96 recorded crashes along Holgate Road and Acomb Road. He said the road was so wide it ‘almost invited’ some motorists to drive recklessly. “Something could so easily go wrong,” he said. “You’ve got a school on that road, two churches, shops at either end, a working men’s club, the Fox pub. We’re just asking for trouble.” Cllr Taylor said a properly enforced 20mph zone would help. But he said more was needed – including cycle lanes that ran the full length of the road, and a proper signalled pedestrian crossing at Acomb Primary School. “That’s a daily nightmare,” he said. Cllr Taylor admitted that Acomb Road wasn’t the only road in York that had problems. “It’s roads all over York,” he said. That is why it is vital that road safety is factored into the ongoing consultation on York’s transport system – and any transport strategy that comes out of it, he said. Cllr Taylor says the new strategy should take account of data on road accidents. “It’s great that we’re doing it (developing a new transport strategy) at last, but we mustn’t ignore issues that existed before the consultation,” he said. “We’re not starting from Year Zero. We have years of issues.” York’s ongoing 10-week transport consultation was launched in November. Council bosses say it is first time since 2010 that the authority has looked ‘holistically’ at all the different modes of transport across the whole of York – from the footstreets and city centre to villages and rural areas. The online consultation features interactive digital maps where those taking part can report areas of concert such as pinch-points or red light jumping. The top road safety issued reported so far is about the poor quality of road and pavement surfaces – followed by vehicles passing too close. Speaking to The Press last week, the council’s executive member for transport Cllr Pete Kilbane said he had been ‘really encouraged by the open and honest conversations we’re having’. “”It’s not too late to take part and if you have not yet contributed then we really do want to hear from you,” he said. The consultation closes at 11.59pm on Sunday February 4. You can have your say at ourbigconversation.york.gov.uk/